AUTISM RESEARCH by BAAC MEMBERS

(March; Vol.125 2017)

Environmental Health PerspectivesConclusions suggesting assoication of higher levels of some organochlorine compounds during pregnancy with ASD and ID.

(March; Vol. 38 2017)

Annual Review of Public Health — Discussion of future challenges and goals for ASD epidemiology as well as public health implications.

( 2016)

KQED Radio — One BAAC Member shares her a short perspective and has also recently published a book titled, Beyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum.
Anne K. Ross is the pen name for an award-winning writer and school psychologist with three decades of experience working in public schools in Northern California. She holds a master’s degree in educational psychology, a Ph.D. in clinical psychology, and an MFA in creative writing. She is a past winner of an American Psychological Association dissertation research award, and she has published in professional and literary journals. Her creative writing has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and a Lambda Literary Award. She is the mother of two young adult sons.

(January 2016)

UCSF News Center — A team of scientists including BAAC Member, Matt State, MD, PhD, have discovered that estrogens reverse a striking behavioral abnormality in zebrafish carrying mutations in a gene known to cause autism in humans which may also help explain lower autism susceptibility in girls. Read more.

(November 2015)

Spectrum — California Department of Public Health Epidemiolgist and BAAC Member, Gayle Windham, Ph.D. discusses prenatal hormone exposure among children with autism.

(September 2015)

Molecular Autism — Stanford researchers, Kaustubh Supekar and Vinod Menon, attempt to characterize neuroanatomical differences underlying the distinct behavioral profiles observed in girls and boys with ASD.

(February 2015)

Molecular Psychiatry — A wonderful example of a Bay Area collaborative project involving 3 BAAC members examining whether maternal copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to autism spectrum disorders.

(January 2015)

Epidemiology — BAAC Member, Gayle Windham investigates the relation between traffic-related air pollution and autism.

(September 2014)

Autism Research and Treatment — BAAC Member Jennifer Yu helps explore disability identification and self-efficacy.  These two subjective factors are critical for the developmental and logistical tasks associated with emerging adulthood. This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 to examine the prevalence and correlates of disability identification and self-efficacy among college students on the autism spectrum

(June 2014)

UCSF Website — Article discussing implications of a collaborative research project between researchers at the Universtity of California, San Francisco and the California Department of Public Health studying the genetic basis and risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

(June 2014)

UCSF NewsletterBAAC Member, Stephen Bent and other UCSF researchers have completed the first Internet-based clinical trial for children with autism, establishing it as a viable and cost effective method of conducting high-quality and rapid clinical trials in this population.

(February 2014)

Science Daily — By CHORI researchers, Rhonda Patrick, Ph.D.& Bruce Ames, Ph.D. 

(October 2013)

Video — Lisa Croen, Ph.D., from the Northern CA Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, presents, "The Epidemiology of Autism: Genetic and Environmental Interplay" at the Inaugural Symposium for the Wendy Klag Center for Autism & Developmental Disabilities.

(August 2013)

San Jose Mercury News — Story featuring Stanford researcher Dr. Teresa Iuculano.

(June 2013)

Los Angeles TimesScience Now story featuring Stanford researcher Dr. Lucina Uddin.

(June 2013)

NPR broadcast — Featuring Stanford researcher Dr. Vinod Menon.

(June 2013)

Time Magazine — Story featuring Stanford researcher Dr. Vinod Menon.

(Spring 2012)

Stanford Medicine Newletter — Special Report

(April 2012)

Youtube — Video featuring Lisa Croen, PhD.

(July 2011)

NPR broadcast — Featuring Stanford researcher, Dr. Joachim Hallmayer.